Overtime laws can be confusing since they vary from state to state. We get it! Save yourself the time and headache of trying to find them. We’ve got an easy to read list ready for you.

The federal overtime provisions are contained in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Unless exempt, employees covered by the Act must receive overtime pay for hours worked over 40 in a workweek at a rate not less than time and one-half their regular rates of pay. There is no limit in the Act on the number of hours employees aged 16 and older may work in any workweek. The Act does not require overtime pay for work on Saturdays, Sundays, holidays, or regular days of rest, unless overtime is worked on such days.

The Act applies on a workweek basis. An employee's workweek is a fixed and regularly recurring period of 168 hours — seven consecutive 24-hour periods. It need not coincide with the calendar week, but may begin on any day and at any hour of the day. Different workweeks may be established for different employees or groups of employees. Averaging of hours over two or more weeks is not permitted. Normally, overtime pay earned in a particular workweek must be paid on the regular payment day for the pay period in which the wages were earned.

Many states simply follow the Federal guidelines for overtime compensation; however, some of them have set their own laws for overtime. The following are brief overviews of the overtime laws for each state:

  • Alabama: No overtime provisions
  • Alaska: Time and a half after 8 hours worked in a day / 40 hours worked per week
    • Laws apply to employers of 4 or more employees and commerce or manufacturing businesses
  • Arizona: No overtime provisions
  • Arkansas: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Laws apply to employers of 4 or more employees
  • California: Time and a half after 8 hours worked in a day / 40 hours worked per week / double time after 12 hours worked in a day
  • Colorado: Time and a half after 12 hours worked in a day / 40 hours worked per week
  • Connecticut: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Premium pay on weekends, holidays, or 6th or 7th consecutive day
  • Delaware: No overtime provisions
  • District of Columbia: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • Florida: No overtime provisions
  • Georgia: No overtime provisions
  • Hawaii: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Dairy, sugar cane, and seasonal agricultural work: 48 hours per week
  • Idaho: No overtime provisions
  • Illinois: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Laws apply to employers of 4 or more employees
  • Indiana: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • Iowa: No overtime provisions
  • Kansas: Time and a half after 46 hours worked per week
  • Kentucky: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • Louisiana: No overtime provisions
  • Maine: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Employee cannot be required to work more than 80 hours of overtime in any 2-week period
  • Maryland: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • 48 hours for bowling alleys and residential employees caring for the sick, elderly, or mentally ill (excluding hospitals); 60 hour for agricultural work
  • Massachusetts: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • Michigan: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Laws apply to employers of 2 or more employees
  • Minnesota: Time and a half after 48 hours worked per week
  • Mississippi: No overtime provisions
  • Missouri: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week / 52 hours for seasonal amusement or recreation business
  • Montana: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week / 48 hours for students working seasonal jobs at amusement or recreation areas
  • Nebraska: No overtime provisions
  • Nevada: Time and a half after 8 hours worked in a day / 40 hours worked per week
  • New Hampshire: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • New Jersey: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • New Mexico: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • New York: Time and a half after 40 hours (for non-residential workers) and 44 hours (for residential workers) worked per week
  • North Carolina: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week / 45 hours a week in seasonal amusement or recreational establishments
  • North Dakota:Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week / 50 hours per week for cab drivers
  • Ohio: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Laws apply to employers who gross more than $297,000 a year
  • Oklahoma: No overtime provisions
  • Oregon: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • Pennsylvania: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • Rhode Island: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Time and a half for Sunday and holiday work is required for most retail businesses
  • South Carolina: No overtime provisions
  • South Dakota: No overtime provisions
  • Tennessee: No overtime provisions
  • Texas: No overtime provisions
  • Utah: No overtime provisions
  • Vermont: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Laws apply to employers of 2 or more employees
  • Virginia: No overtime provisions
  • Washington: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
  • West Virginia: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
    • Laws apply to employees of 6 or more employees at one location
  • Wisconsin: Time and a half after 40 hours worked per week
Wyoming: No overtime provisions